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Think Spring

For the date of November 22, we focus on the letter “V”. The blessing is violets.

Violet

Delicate. Beautiful. A sign of spring and warmer days to come. We can either look back to the violets that bloomed in spring past — or look forward to the fragile petals to come.

Either way — keep them in mind — I have a fine china tea cup decorated with violets in a place of honor. (It may need to yield to Christmas decorations). Do you have display items or clothing with violets?

HIDING PLACES, a sweet romance, is set in Wisconsin during the month of June. Violets are past, but recent enough to have a secure place in a person’s mind. For a peek at apple orchard activities, check it out. Kindle: https://amzn.to/2Jm26GQ

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Welcome May

Did you celebrate May Day?

When I was a child, the tradition was to make a paper cone basket, add some early flowers, take the gift to a neighbor, and run away before they answered the door.

Or did you have a party? Special food? Dancing? Is a May Pole part of your tradition?

The month of May includes lots of good things. Warmer weather to plant gardens. Grass, nurtured by spring rain, races toward the sun. Mother’s Day is celebrated in the United States. My high school and college graduations had May dates — as did those for my children. Memorial Day — to remember those fallen in war — ends the month. (And begins the summer weekend traditions.)

The delicate blossoms of lily-of-the-valley greet people from shady spots in flower beds. This official flower of the month is one of my favorites. Breath deep — can you imagine the scent?

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Forget the Date…

The calendar claimed spring arrived on March 20.

I’m not sure about where you live, but this year, signs of spring were sparse on that date in my neighborhood. For one thing — my azalea showed only a hint of bud on that date. No fool — my plants waited for warmer days to open blossoms.

A better sign of spring that a date on a calendar?

The photo is from several years ago — but when the forsythia blooms on the berm — spring is in the air!

The cheerful, yellow flowers of early spring lift a person’s spirts and give promise of life after the gloom and gray of winter.

Do you have favorite early spring flower?

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Cheerful Color

Yellow, in light and medium shades, was a common color for kitchen walls when I was a child. Cheerful and bright were the comments from the adults in my life.

Years later, while discussing colors prior to painting my office, a friend described yellow as a creative color. Evidently people have done studies on colors. Yes, red stimulates appetite. (You’ll find lots of red accents in restaurants.) Yellow, even in small amounts – in a piece of art, a pillow, or curtains – stimulates creativity.

A person can also think of yellow as a spring color — full of hope and promise. Winter is gone. Early spring flowers open yellow petals to warming air.

Snowbanks are melting as I write this blog and enjoy this photo from four years ago. Yes, it’s possible to have color in St. Louis before February ends. Rejoice! Smile! The days are filled with more light and signs of a new season.

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Caution Zone

One of the popular memes on social media which I enjoy is simple:

When you can be anything — be kind.

Good advice for multiple situations.

Does a neighbor give a grumpy response to your greeting? Be kind — smile anyway.

Does another driver on the road block your lane change? Be kind — draw a deep breath and keep your hands in a polite position.

Does a child ask 100 questions in a row? Be kind — you were young once.

Kindness is good when dealing with plants also. Remember they are living. You’ve not need to break leaves or stems in fun or anger. (Well, if it prevents doing bodily harm to a human it would be an good alternate.)

However, do not consider all plants defenseless.

Mix caution with kindness when dealing with Crown of Thorns. The delicate, tiny blossoms cling to a strong defense system.